Smells like death to me, how about you?

Study: How likes, dislikes from sniffing are encoded in the brain. January 16th, 2014

Excerpt: “…the aversion is innate-it’s not learned-and that it involves genetic circuits that are genetically predetermined, that exist, dormant, in the animal waiting for it to encounter the odor.”

Journal article abstract excerpt: This smell is mainly carried by two small aliphatic diamines, putrescine and cadaverine, which are generated by bacterial decarboxylation of the basic amino acids ornithine and lysine. Depending on the species, these diamines may also serve as feeding attractants, oviposition attractants, or social cues.

My comment: In my model, nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled alternative splicings of pre-mRNA and amino acid substitutions lead to the chromosomal rearrangements associated with species-specific morphology and behavior. The amino acid substitutions stabilize the thermodynamics of intercellular signaling and organism-level thermoregulation.

Bacterial decarboxylation of any nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled amino acid substitutions that enable species-wide epistasis would be a likely indicator that smells like death to a conspecific and a likely indicator of a potential food source to a heterospecific. The transition from a species-specific chemical signal of fitness to a signal associated with impending death or bacterial decomposition would help different species establish and maintain their ecological niche.

See also Kohl (2013) “In the mouse model, the diet of the mice determines their nutrient-dependent pheromone production and social interactions with other mice. The mouse model also reveals something that was not revealed in the context of dogs and wolves (Axelsson et al., 2013; Lord, 2013). The aversive human body odor associated with fish odor syndrome can be epigenetically controlled by reducing dietary choline intake. It can also be controlled through antibiotic use (citations in Li et al., 2013). This may be important in the context of chemical ecology and epigenetic effects of genetically predisposed nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled human interactions (Martin et al., 2010; Preti & Leyden, 2010).”
About James V. Kohl 1308 Articles
James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones. Recently, Kohl integrated scientific evidence that pinpoints the evolved neurophysiological mechanism that links olfactory/pheromonal input to genes in hormone-secreting cells of tissue in a specific area of the brain that is primarily involved in the sensory integration of olfactory and visual input, and in the development of human sexual preferences. His award-winning 2007 article/book chapter on multisensory integration: The Mind’s Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences followed an award winning 2001 publication: Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology, which was coauthored by disinguished researchers from Vienna. Rarely do researchers win awards in multiple disciplines, but Kohl’s 2001 award was for neuroscience, and his 2007 “Reiss Theory” award was for social science. Kohl has worked as a medical laboratory scientist since 1974, and he has devoted more than twenty-five years to researching the relationship between the sense of smell and the development of human sexual preferences. Unlike many researchers who work with non-human subjects, medical laboratory scientists use the latest technology from many scientific disciplines to perform a variety of specialized diagnostic medical testing on people. James V. Kohl is certified with: * American Society for Clinical Pathology * American Medical Technologists James V. Kohl is a member of: * Society for Neuroscience * Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology * Association for Chemoreception Sciences * Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality * International Society for Human Ethology * American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science * Mensa, the international high IQ society