Presentation on Human Pheromones delivered on August 3, 2010

International Society of Human Ethology, August 1-5, 2010, Madison, Wisconsin

J. V. Kohl

Human Pheromones: Linking Neuroendocrinology and Ethology (revisited)

Abstract

The evolution of food choice and mate choice provides a bottom-up model that reveals we are genetically predisposed to respond to olfactory/pheromonal input with alterations that occur in hormone-secreting cells of tissue in the brain. With unparalleled reciprocity, the development of human personal preferences for visually perceived physical features is accompanied by a top-down model. The direct effect of the olfactory/pheromonal input on the central nervous system alters the genetically predisposed maturation of the neuroendocrine system and the reproductive system during a behavioral maturation sequence driven by the same hormone-secreting nerve cells. This direct effect of olfactory/pheromonal input is associated with other sensory input from the social environment that is not required for the development of human personal preferences (e.g., visual input associated with visually perceived physical features). Cultural effects on behavior are effects of gene-culture co-evolution that allows us to think about the relative salience of sensory input.

Talk Proposal

Visual input from our social environment co-exists in reports of observed behavioral affects that tend to confuse co-existence with cause and effect. This confusion arises from the failure to incorporate evidence of an evolved neurophysiological mechanism that directly links what we see to changes in hormones that affect our social behavior. The failure to mention this required neurophysiological mechanism is exemplified in reports that link visual stimuli to co-existing personal preferences for the physical features of others. Human personal preferences for these physical features are most often linked to visual input in the absence of any mammalian model for their development.

Any evolved link to mammalian behavior from a sensory stimulus in the social environment must incorporate five levels of biological organization that allow the link to evolve: 1. gene; 2. cell; 3. tissue; 4. organ; 5. organ system. During embryonic and prenatal development of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), genes in cells of tissue in the brain (i.e., the most important organ of any organ system associated with the development of behavior) predispose the ability of hypothalamic tissue to generate the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). The hypothalamic GnRH pulse modulates the concurrent maturation of the reproductive system, the neuroendocrine system, and the CNS during behavioral development.

It is generally agreed that the social behavior of many other animals is affected most by olfactory/pheromonal input, which acts on GnRH pulsatility. A mammalian model details how olfactory/pheromonal input alters genes in cells of tissue in the brain. This bottom-up gene-cell–tissue-organ-organ system model has its evolutionary basis in animal models of food choice and mate choice, both of which are required for survival of all species that sexually reproduce. With unparalleled reciprocity, the development of human personal preferences for visually perceived physical features is accompanied by a top-down explanation. The direct effect of the olfactory/pheromonal input on the CNS alters the genetically predisposed maturation of the neuroendocrine system and the reproductive system during the behavioral maturation sequence that is driven by the hormone-secreting (i.e., GnRH) nerve cells.

This genetically predisposed behavioral maturation sequence incorporates evolutionary aspects of self/non-self recognition (immune system function) and evolutionary aspects of sex differences and their recognition. Cultural effects on behavior are attributed to gene-culture co-evolution, rather than to any vague means by which culture might otherwise influence behavior.

About James V. Kohl 1307 Articles
James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones. Recently, Kohl integrated scientific evidence that pinpoints the evolved neurophysiological mechanism that links olfactory/pheromonal input to genes in hormone-secreting cells of tissue in a specific area of the brain that is primarily involved in the sensory integration of olfactory and visual input, and in the development of human sexual preferences. His award-winning 2007 article/book chapter on multisensory integration: The Mind’s Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences followed an award winning 2001 publication: Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology, which was coauthored by disinguished researchers from Vienna. Rarely do researchers win awards in multiple disciplines, but Kohl’s 2001 award was for neuroscience, and his 2007 “Reiss Theory” award was for social science. Kohl has worked as a medical laboratory scientist since 1974, and he has devoted more than twenty-five years to researching the relationship between the sense of smell and the development of human sexual preferences. Unlike many researchers who work with non-human subjects, medical laboratory scientists use the latest technology from many scientific disciplines to perform a variety of specialized diagnostic medical testing on people. James V. Kohl is certified with: * American Society for Clinical Pathology * American Medical Technologists James V. Kohl is a member of: * Society for Neuroscience * Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology * Association for Chemoreception Sciences * Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality * International Society for Human Ethology * American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science * Mensa, the international high IQ society