Pheromones, reproduction, love, neurogenesis

Reproduction: A New Venue for Studying Function of Adult Neurogenesis?
pp. 21-35(15)  Cell Transplantation, Volume 20, Number 1 Authors: Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Yau, Suk-Yu; So, Kwok-Fai

Free PDF https://docserver.ingentaconnect.com/deliver/connect/cog/09636897/v20n1/s4.pdf?expires=1299897616&id=61681746&titleid=5476&accname=Guest+User&checksum=A62AE3EA0F93C3A5A2B64ADEB94A6FF0

Abstract: Adult neurogenesis has been a focus within the past few years because it is a newly recognized form of neuroplasticity that may play significant roles in behaviors and recovery process after disease. Mammalian adult neurogenesis could be found in two brain regions: hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ). While it is well established that hippocampal neurogenesis participates in memory formation and anxiety, the physiological function of SVZ neurogenesis is still under intense investigation. Recent studies disclose that SVZ neurogenesis is under regulation of reproductive cues like pheromones. Reciprocally, the newborn neurons may exert their effect on reproductive and maternal behaviors. This review discusses recent understanding of the interrelationship between neurogenesis and reproduction. The studies highlighted in this review illustrate the potential importance of neurogenesis in reproductive function and will provide new insights for the significance of adult neurogenesis.

From the conclusion: Experiment from different species demonstrated the regulatory effects of pheromones and sexual interaction on brain neurogenesis; however, the functional significance of new neurons in reproduction needs to be further clarified.

About James V. Kohl 1307 Articles
James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones. Recently, Kohl integrated scientific evidence that pinpoints the evolved neurophysiological mechanism that links olfactory/pheromonal input to genes in hormone-secreting cells of tissue in a specific area of the brain that is primarily involved in the sensory integration of olfactory and visual input, and in the development of human sexual preferences. His award-winning 2007 article/book chapter on multisensory integration: The Mind’s Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences followed an award winning 2001 publication: Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology, which was coauthored by disinguished researchers from Vienna. Rarely do researchers win awards in multiple disciplines, but Kohl’s 2001 award was for neuroscience, and his 2007 “Reiss Theory” award was for social science. Kohl has worked as a medical laboratory scientist since 1974, and he has devoted more than twenty-five years to researching the relationship between the sense of smell and the development of human sexual preferences. Unlike many researchers who work with non-human subjects, medical laboratory scientists use the latest technology from many scientific disciplines to perform a variety of specialized diagnostic medical testing on people. James V. Kohl is certified with: * American Society for Clinical Pathology * American Medical Technologists James V. Kohl is a member of: * Society for Neuroscience * Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology * Association for Chemoreception Sciences * Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality * International Society for Human Ethology * American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science * Mensa, the international high IQ society