Alzheimer’s therapy: scents vs nonsense

Scent and the City By LANCE HOSEY Published: October 25, 2013 in the New York Times

Excerpt: In 2009, medical researchers at Tottori University in Japan found that exposing Alzheimer’s patients to rosemary and lemon in the morning and lavender and orange in the evening resulted in improved cognitive functions. A 2006 study by researchers at the New York University Medical Center discovered that postoperative patients exposed to the smell of lavender reported a higher satisfaction rate with pain control. And a 2007 study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology reported that cancer patients who received massage with aromatic oils experienced a significant improvement in anxiety and depression.

My comment: Given reports like these and more than 650 blog posts here that attest to the overwhelming impact of olfactory/pheromonal input on adaptive behaviors, it surprises me how few people seem to recognize what I am trying to convey about epigenetic cause and effect. Simply put, if you listen to the evolutionary theorists and human ethologists who have not learned anything about biology in the past several decades, you are among those who enable the suffering to continue for families affected by neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s. If not for their staunchly defended opinions about mutation-initiated natural selection by theorists, scientific progress by biologists and physiologists might well have led to additional interest in the alleviation of suffering via the study of Pheromones and the luteinizing hormone for inducing proliferation of neural stem cells and neurogenesis.

 

About James V. Kohl 1308 Articles
James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones. Recently, Kohl integrated scientific evidence that pinpoints the evolved neurophysiological mechanism that links olfactory/pheromonal input to genes in hormone-secreting cells of tissue in a specific area of the brain that is primarily involved in the sensory integration of olfactory and visual input, and in the development of human sexual preferences. His award-winning 2007 article/book chapter on multisensory integration: The Mind’s Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences followed an award winning 2001 publication: Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology, which was coauthored by disinguished researchers from Vienna. Rarely do researchers win awards in multiple disciplines, but Kohl’s 2001 award was for neuroscience, and his 2007 “Reiss Theory” award was for social science. Kohl has worked as a medical laboratory scientist since 1974, and he has devoted more than twenty-five years to researching the relationship between the sense of smell and the development of human sexual preferences. Unlike many researchers who work with non-human subjects, medical laboratory scientists use the latest technology from many scientific disciplines to perform a variety of specialized diagnostic medical testing on people. James V. Kohl is certified with: * American Society for Clinical Pathology * American Medical Technologists James V. Kohl is a member of: * Society for Neuroscience * Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology * Association for Chemoreception Sciences * Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality * International Society for Human Ethology * American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science * Mensa, the international high IQ society