Tag Archive: sexual differentiation

Dual genomes: exposing the evolution industry

genetic code RNA medium

Multiple haplotype-resolved genomes reveal population patterns of gene and protein diplotypes Excerpt: “The CDP showed a significant overrepresentation of certain gene ontology (GO) groups (global tests Po0.001–0.009), using the programme FUNC23 (Methods). These groups included GPCRs, in particular olfactory receptors…
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It’s cell type differention, not cell fate determination (2)

genetic code RNA medium

See: It’s cell type differention, not cell fate determination High-throughput engineering of a mammalian genome reveals building principles of methylation states at CG rich regions Excerpt: “…deviation from the derived models is a characteristic hallmark of methylation changes associated with…
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It’s cell type differention, not cell fate determination

terrarium eco system

“…it was only recently (the past 15 years or so) that scientists discovered that a basic set of the same proteins and mRNAs are involved in all of embryogenesis.” This ignores what we described nearly 18 years ago in the…
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No understanding of biodiversity

terrarium eco system

No single explanation for biodiversity in Madagascar Excerpt: “The study is part of a larger body of research aimed at identifying the climate, geology and other features of the environment that help bring new species of plants and animals into…
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Genomic surveillance ends our world of RNA-mediated ecological adaptations

social interaction and brain

Why is this woman smiling? 1) Identifying Recent Adaptations in Large-Scale Genomic Data Senior author: Sabeti with co-author Rinn Excerpt: “As natural selection can only act on mutations that drive phenotypic variation…”. 2) Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and…
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Human Pheromones and the Biology of Behavior

scentoferos

“Symptoms” of well-understood brain activity are clearly established via rewards and experience-dependent conditioned preferences that depend on hormonal changes driven by the effects of odors. Food odors and social odors elicit these “symptoms” of activity